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TV and Film Map

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I have all the maps which have been made by this company. They work closely with the Ordnance Survey.

Their new map shows the location of Film and TV locations in the UK, along with other details of specific places. There are the locations of cinemas and other film related places as well.

I'm just back from the SAGT conference, of which more to come, and I've previously done a session on the use of the Scottish landscape by Pixar when they made the film 'Brave'. Another series made in the area around Stirling is Outlander, and I noticed quite a few souvenirs related to that area in the visitor centres that I went to.
A good Christmas gift for the geographer in your life.

The Lighthouse

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Over to Cambridge last night to watch this movie as part of the Cambridge Film Festival. It's a powerful vision of the descent into madness of two lighthouse keepers who find themselves staying beyond their allotted time: "to 4 weeks". The sound design and visuals are fantastic, and black and white is of course the best format for this sort of psychodrama. There are many themes explored with nods to Melville, The Ancient Mariner, mermaids and Prometheus and the theft of fire.

It's also very much about creating and then slowly dismantling a 'place': the rock containing the island, some buildings which need constant maintenance, a large coal pile, some buried whisky and a very persistent seagull.
Catch this when it comes out in the New Year and go for a deep dive which is actually worth it...

Surrey Geography Network Meetings

For those who are in Surrey or within easy reach, Brendan Conway has shared details of what looks like a very useful series of events in the next few months, and into 2020.
As you can see, there are some excellent speakers including the 'mighty' Simon Oakes and the GA's very own Alan Kinder.

Details for booking are at the bottom of the blogpost.

Surrey Geography Network meetings 2019-20

These are designed to help you to address current issues whilst at the same time networking with other geography leaders / teachers.
The meetings will take place at Notre Dame School KT11 1HA from 1.30 to 4.30. The dates, speakers and their topics are as follows​:

Tuesday 19th November: Enabling Data Skills in the Geography Curriculum, Dr Simon Oakes - former chief examiner, author and education consultant
The session will present some excellent ideas for embedding data skills into Geography lessons. It will draw on Simon's Royal Geographical Society funded project work as well as his ow…

Carbon City Zero Game

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Carbon City Zero is a new Kickstarter project which is developed by the people behind 10:10 Climate Action. It's a card game which explores the idea of carbon reduction.

Here's the description.

As a newly appointed city mayor you have been tasked with creating a carbon neutral city. It sounds easy, but you'll soon discover that your carbon budgets are hard to balance. Can you hit the zero carbon target before your rivals? The race to become the first zero carbon city is on... Carbon City Zero is a deck-building game for 2-4 players, in which players develop a sustainable city by building factories, managing people, lobbying government ministers, and raising public awareness. Each player starts with an identical Draw Deck (and a Carbon Level of 40), buying additional cards from a shared Marketplace to create a more sustainable city. Balancing the need to generate income with reducing carbon, players can follow numerous paths to victory, creating synergies between Government, …

9/1 - Disaster Prevention Day

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The 1st of September is Disaster Prevention Day in Japan.

It commemorates the Great Kanto earthquake that took place on that date in 1923


9/1 is Bosai (#DisasterPrevention) Day--visit the #BosaiDiversity site and better prepare yourself by discovering the many unique emergency needs of a diverse society. https://t.co/EMUl9rpaLi#ResilientJapan#LandOfDiversitypic.twitter.com/qCqymatg2C — The Gov't of Japan (@JapanGov) September 1, 2019
I've blogged previously about my Tokyo Bosai book, which was handed out to all households in the city. One of them decided to sell theirs on eBay.

Check out the Bosai Diversity website for a video and a set of cards of items which would be of particular value to particular people. 



Click on the cards and tags and assemble your own kit, and recognise the different needs should a disaster arise.

You can also share the kit you create with others...



Looking to see if I can find the cards as a PDF download rather than digital asset...

Norfolk - flat?

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There are a few quotes that are associated with Norfolk, the county where I have now lived for more than half my life, and one of them is from a character called Amanda in the Noel Coward play 'Private Lives' from 1930, who says it is "very flat".
Anyone who has cycled through Norfolk can testify that it is far from flat.

Back in 2011, I was the President of the Norfolk Geographical Association, and for my presidential talk (which was also used for after dinner speeches) I created a talk exploring the sense of place that Norfolk has and explored what it means to different people.


Very flat, Norfolk from GeoBlogs
Interestingly, the Royal Geographical Society's Discovering Britain project (which has created walks with accompanying information for many locations around the country) have a walk based around Sheringham which takes that very name: Very flat, Norfolk.

The walk was written by Daniel Evans, a Gap Year scholar of the Royal Geographical Society, who I met wit…

Tokyo - planning for disaster

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A nice piece on Atlas Obscura.

It describes a daily ritual which can be observed (or rather, heard) across Japan, at or around 5pm.

It's the shichouson bousai gyousei musen housou



It’s known as the ‘5pm Chime’ (五時のチャイム) or, more officially (and tellingly), the ‘Municipal Disaster Management Radio Communication Network’ (市町村防災行政無線). That should give you some clue as to what it is for, and why you’ve probably never really understood it. After all, if all you’ve ever heard is eerie chimes or music at dusk, that likely means you’ve not experienced any major disasters (a good thing!)

Officially then, the speaker network is part of a nationwide system set up around most villages, towns and cities to warn residents in the case of emergency – especially disaster warnings for tsunamis and informational broadcasts in response to earthquakes.

Some systems are also set up to broadcast announcements of severe weather, fire, suspicious persons, dangerous wildlife or simply just public announcem…