Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Culture and Hazards

Over to King Edward VI 5 Ways school in SW Birmingham today. A cross-country trip with more amazing weather thanks to the current high pressure.

Took a tour through the southern suburbs of Birmingham thanks to my Garmin which came into its own here.
Thanks to Bob Lang and Paula Cooper for the invitation and for hosting us all so well, and giving me a guided tour of the department and the school.

The school is certainly a geographical "hub". It's a Humanities school with a 'Geography' specialism, a GA branch, and the centre of an RGS local network. The teaching staff include several Chartered Geographers, and the school also holds a GA Secondary Geography Quality Mark and is a Centre of Excellence.

Met up with Professor Iain Stewart from Plymouth University, and a PhD student of his: Kate Donovan, who were delivering a lecture on the theme of geological hazards and their cultural references.
Iain is an honorary Vice President of the GA, and also a Primary Geography Champion.

Image: thanks to Ian Dixson
Left to right: me, Bob Lang, Iain Stewart, Paula Cooper, Kate Donovan

The lecture was excellent, and drew a crowd of between 300 and 350 people to the school's hall. Also good to meet up with colleagues new and old and virtual....

I will be writing a separate report on the lecture with my notes, and also sharing Iain's slides, which he is keen to do...

An excellent evening...

Friday, September 25, 2009

Stuffed and Starved


Stuffed and Starved
Just read most of this yesterday on a train journey back from London, and it's a great book for those teaching about issues related to food.
The supporting website has a range of resources which would be useful for those wanting additional reference material, including useful related YouTube clips.
On the Amazon.co.uk website you can currently "Look inside" the book...

Also lots of mentions of the word geography, which is always a bonus :)

Social Inequality

Image by Alan Parkinson, and available under Creative Commons license

A conference for level 3 students of Geography, Humanities, Sociology and Health Studies.
Organised by Carl Lee, and took place at the University of Sheffield.

Danny Dorling and colleagues John Pritchard and Dan Vickers from SASI were present, and presented on the issue of Social Inequality, using images from WORLDMAPPER and talking about their work.

The second session involved a discussion on tackling inquality.

Thanks to Carl for the invitation. Carl has added a range of the resources that were used at the event to the EDEXCEL 'A' LEVEL NING. It is also worth hunting out a copy of Carl's excellent book on Sheffield: "Home: a Personal Geography of Sheffield"

The SASI website features a range of very useful links for those interested in teaching and learning about social inequality.

Some notes that I took in the first part of the day will hopefully be added in due course...

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Incantations

Wow..
Remember seeing this at the time, over 30 years ago...


Friday, September 18, 2009

Facebook Profile Template

Check out the great new resources from Tony Cassidy

The resources take the shape of a template to produce a FACEBOOK-style "profile"
The profile could be for a culture, company, musical or literature genre etc...
The template is here:

And followed shortly after by a TWITTER template, also produced by the inimitable Tony...

Quality stuff...

UPDATE: Here is some fantastic work by Year 9 students from Seaford Head Community College, who used the idea in their Geography lessons with Miss Smith. I love these. Thanks for sharing. I'd love to see some other examples...

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Latest Shift Happens update

Latest Shift Happens update



Because it fills 5 minutes of any CPD session...

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Jonathan Meades on Sustainability

Have blogged about Jonathan Meades before, and his particular presentation style which I like...

Lunchtime today was spent in the company of the first in the series "Off-Kilter", made for BBC Scotland and was about Aberdeen. I liked the look of the area known as Fitty.
Towards the end, he moved on to Donald Trump and his controversial plans for a golf course in the sand dunes close to Aberdeen.

He called the planned development "New Trumpton on Sea" and talked about gated communities and their absentee residents.

He riffed on the idea of 'sustainability' and how every architect and development trumpeted its sustainable credentials.
New words like : "Sustain-abulous" and "Sustain-astic" !

Called it "architectural correctness"...

"It's a slogan of conformist unoriginality..."

"The very act of making a building is energy hungry and vastly wasteful even if the building is an eco-igloo of Fairtrade otter droppings, carbon-neutral Panda scraps, ethical vegan meat, organic yoghurt blocks, recycled slurry and and bio-degradable avocado face wipe...the only truly sustainable present is one in which we do not build..."

The show is available on iPLAYER.

Friday, September 4, 2009

Postcards of the Future

Thanks to Paul Cornish on SLN for the tip off to this great Flash movie of Postcards of the Future.
Click the image below to see the movie (SWF format)If you need a blank postcard template (they work well printed on card), you can borrow mine from here.


Great work by Patrick Blower at Live Draw - check it out here.

Two more relevant ones in the archive:
Geo Engineering saves the World, and Ecotown

New GA website now live....

The GA web team: Anne Greaves and Ben Major, have been working away for months with designers Ledgard Jepson on a new website for the Geographical Association, and it is now live, after several weeks of beta testing and tweaking. Visit the GA URL http://www.geography.org.uk to see the new site.

The site looks a lot brighter, clearer and easier to navigate, and uses more of the screen’s width. Thanks to a major effort on tagging the resources, it is also easier to find things using the ‘Search’ function if they are not immediately obvious from the home page, and a new ‘Resource Finder’ should help you find something appropriate to the key stage and topic that you are interested in quickly, or items written by a particular author.

A one page user guide to the new site and how it’s laid out can be downloaded by following the link (PDF download): http://www.geography.org.uk/download/GA_NewWebsiteGuide.pdf

Members can also bookmark their most useful sections of the website on their own personal homepage. Logging in to the site will provide members with details about their account, and allow access to the journals which you subscribe to.

There are plenty of new items in the shop, which are displayed in a scrolling window, which will also suggest items that might be of relevance to you if you login.

News is easier to find, and has all been updated.

If you are not already a GA member, this is a good time to join and take advantage of the many membership benefits.

The website is also home to all the resources supporting the GA’s manifesto for school geography “a different view”.

Download the latest GA MAGAZINE from the site now

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Facebook and Tony Cassidy

Tony Cassidy's latest contribution to the geography resources pantheon is a resource which is based on the profile that people create when they join FACEBOOK.
Tony has created a blank FACEBOOK profile template in powerpoint, which could then be used to create a template for a huge variety of contexts within the geography classroom.
What if they had a Facebook profile?
View more presentations from TonyCassidy.

Tony himself suggests producing one for Old Harry: an extension of the classic - "Old Harry: This is your Life" idea....
On the SLN Forum, further ideas that were suggested by a number of colleagues included:
  • The area / street the students live in
  • A new migrant arriving in the UK
  • Teenager in Kenya
  • Resident of Dubai
  • Young person on Baffin Island
  • Mt. Vesuvius
Could also do it for a Country...

Could also use it as a context for teaching about e-safety

As many teachers in England and Wales prepare to return to school this week, this is just the sort of simple, creative resource that should strike a chord with pupils and ensure some thoughtful "writing" to start the new geographical year...

Slow Coast

It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle. Ernest Hemingway


Nick Hand is currently cycling around the coast of Britain. His website is SLOW COAST.
Along the way, he is creating some wonderful short films, called SOUNDSLIDES made up of interviews with artisans and images taken at various locations.

A recent addition was the famous Monday auction held on the green at Burnham Market.
This gives a real "sense of place" and it instantly got onto the planning sheet for a lecture next year on Norfolk and "sense of place"...

These would be relatively easy to make with students, as they need a sound recorder, and Audacity to do a spot of editing, plus a set of images.

You can follow Nick on Twitter too: @nickhand

WDWTWA and a different view

It may be that you haven't yet visited the Who do we think we are website.

WHO DO WE THINK WE ARE has a very useful section written by Professor David Lambert, which provides an excellent summary of the appropriate links between geography and identity.

The site also has a NEW interactive area, which contains ideas for teaching about cultural diversity in various contexts...